The Atlantic Wolffish Anarhichas lupus, a.k.a. the “sea wolf” or “wolf eel” is a voracious ocean…

via John Currin (JC’s Nature) – Google+ Public Posts http://ift.tt/2y5bOaV

The TerraMar Project
originally shared:

The Atlantic Wolffish Anarhichas lupus, a.k.a. the "sea wolf" or "wolf eel" is a voracious ocean predator. Confined to the cold waters of the North Atlantic Ocean, these animals actually have blood that produces natural anti-freeze compounds. Using their large head, powerful jaws, and canine teeth, the Atlantic Wolffish consumes hard-bodies invertebrates near the ocean floor. Atlantic Wolffish are actually considered to be a keystone species to North Atlantic food webs because of their impact on sea urchins and other invertebrate populations in rocky reef ecosystems.

Generally not harmful to humans when in the ocean, the Atlantic Wolffish has gained a reputation by fishermen for being a dangerous animal when pulled from the sea. With such a powerful head and teeth, these animals have been known to bite just about anything that comes in contact with them, and to not let go.

Considered a species of concern by NOAA, these animals are slow to mature and have experienced population declines in recent history. Atlantic Wolffish are considered "good eating", and have been fished for commercially and recreationally in the past which is likely the cause of their population decline.

To learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans, visit us at: http://ift.tt/XJinpo

Photo: Citron-Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#marinespecies #wolffish #Atlantic #marinelife #TerraMar #keystonespecies

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A Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) on the beach at Etty Bay, Queensland, Australia.

via John Currin (JC’s Nature) – Google+ Public Posts http://ift.tt/2y3ItQu

Guy Verkroost
originally shared:

A Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) on the beach at Etty Bay, Queensland, Australia.

Cinereous tit (Parus cinereus) – 134 – Image 3

via John Currin (JC’s Nature) – Google+ Public Posts http://ift.tt/2y5VUwW

Vilas Sawant
originally shared:

Cinereous tit (Parus cinereus) – 134 – Image 3

These birds are usually seen in pairs or small groups that sometimes join mixed-species foraging flocks. They forage mainly by gleaning, capturing insects (mainly caterpillars, bugs and beetles) that are disturbed and will also feeding on buds and fruits.They sometimes use their feet to hold insects which are then torn with their beak. They may also wedge hard seeds in a bark crevice before hammering them with their beak

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This Beluga Whale is just so happy that it’s almost the weekend! Beluga whales are some of the…

via John Currin (JC’s Nature) – Google+ Public Posts http://ift.tt/2y5VXJ8

The TerraMar Project
originally shared:

This Beluga Whale is just so happy that it's almost the weekend! Beluga whales are some of the smallest whale species in the world, found in the cold waters of the Arctic Ocean.

Nicknamed "Sea Canaries", these whales are some of the most vocal species in the ocean, and travel together across the Arctic in pods. Beluga whales are most closely related to the Narwal, in that they're the only two members of the Monodontidae family. These white whales can dive for up to 25 minutes down to depths of 800 meters where they feed on fish, crustaceans, and worms.

Beluga Whales are listed under the IUCN Red List as Near Threatened, because their populations are known to be threatened by climate change, hunting, oil and gas development, and industrial and urban pollution. Polar bears and killer whales are known predators of belugas throughout their Arctic range.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: http://ift.tt/XJinpo

Photo: Steve Snodgrass/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

#oceanlife #whale #beluga #saveourocean #VitaminSea #CleanSeas #marinemammal #seahope #openocean #oceanhealth

Photo of the Day – The Verditer Flycatcher (Eumyias thalassinus) is a lovely bird found in the…

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Rockjumper – Worldwide Birding Adventures
originally shared:

Photo of the Day – The Verditer Flycatcher (Eumyias thalassinus) is a lovely bird found in the Himalayas to Sumatra through South-east Asia. This species is named after its striking blue plumage, with the males being an intense blue on all areas of the body except for the black eye-patch and grey vent.

This photo was taken by Markus Lilje.

#RockjumperBirding #birds #birding #birdwatching #nature #wildlife #photography #birdphotography #naturephotography #wildlifephotography #flycatcher